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What’s Your ROI? Demonstrating the Value of Design

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John Hayes, the CMO of American Express, is quoted in Charlene Li’s book Open Leadership as saying, “We tend to overvalue the things we can measure, and undervalue the things we cannot.”

Design Projects

Do you know how much revenue your projects generated? Determine how much your projects made in relation to the office revenue. Begin to capture positive client feedback, and colleague feedback specific to any given project. Capture your contributions. Keep track of any outside recognition or awards your projects received. Write a case study to be used by the organization and offer to speak about the project at conferences.

Client Acquisition

Business is reliant on finding and keeping great clients, those that can pay their bills, but are also great partners to work with. Your contributions could include everything from actually preparing business development proposals to utilizing conferences as a way to network for the firm. Just like employees, it’s far easier to retain good clients than find them. Look for opportunities during projects to begin relationships with key clients. Be easy to work with, be available, and be inspirational. Provide them company swag when you can (surprisingly, this goes a long way to making clients feel special). The ROI can be a longer term pay off, but it’s well worth it. Particularly, when a client comes back five years later and remembers you.

Marketing the Firm

Business is reliant on communicating value, whether its value to specific clients, value to the community or value to individuals who want to rise in their chosen profession. Marketing is the voice of the business. From your Twitter and Instagram accounts to speaking and writing on behalf of the business, it’s easier than ever to determine your ROI in this area.

While marketing helps the company, it also helps you develop your platform and personal brand. It’s a win-win and perhaps the most overlooked area for increasing your ROI within a company.

 

One comment

  1. That’s a wise answer to a tricky quteoisn

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